Sprints are a sequence of speech drills I’ve developed, aimed at building pronunciation confidence in new sounds, new words, and common grammar structures. Through consistent repetition, you can create new speaking and pronunciation habits, so it becomes easier to use new sounds, retrieve words, and internalize grammar rules. Practice with me to see how you can significantly boost your pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary with this 10-min pronunciation exercise.
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10-min Powerful Pronunciation Practice | Hadar’s Sprints

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As an English learner, you probably already know that speaking is a big part of improving EVERYTHING about your English.

And if you don’t speak English on a daily basis, when you DO speak, it sometimes feels like you’re only using about 25% of what you know, whether it’s grammar, vocabulary, or pronunciation.

As a result, you get stuck, seem to forget words or how to form a grammatical sentence (have? has?), mispronounce words, and get way too self-conscious and insecure about speaking.

So – how can you overcome this?

How can you create the speaking experience and muscle memory of correct sounds, grammatically correct sentences, and new words, WITHOUT having the opportunity to use it all in context day in and day out?

This is exactly why I created the daily Sprint.

The Sprint is a sequence of pronunciation drills aimed at building your pronunciation confidence with new sounds, new words, and common grammar structures.

Through consistent repetition, you’ll build your muscle memory so it’ll be easier to use these sounds, retrieve words, and internalize the grammar structures you want to use.
All while working from the outside IN.

I’ve been using sprints in my programs and my students tell me this is HANDS DOWN the most effective exercise they’ve ever done.

Today, I want to share with you another great Sprint that I’ve created.

Get ready…. Set…. SPRINT!

TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to the InFluency Podcast. I’m Hadar, and this is episode number 82. And today we are going to sprint, and boost your grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. So buckle up, friends.

Hello, hello, everyone. So, today is a workout day. I’m not going to talk much because I want to get started with the practice. And make sure that you’re alone and that you can practice with me because it’s going to require a lot of drills, and repetitions, and you making funny sounds. So, I’m just saying, and I’m just giving you a fair warning before we go into the sprint, and I’m going to explain what a sprint is in a sec, if you don’t know.

Just so you know, there is a video version of the sprint and it might be a little easier cause sometimes different sounds sound the same if you’re only listening to the audio. So, if you like using this audio, that’s more than awesome, but you might want to watch the video ones to just have a very clear understanding of what we’re doing there.

Also, you can download the PDF with this drill and all the exercises, so I’m going to post the link to it in the description. And I’m going to post the link to my other sprint that I’ve released just recently.

So, let’s not wait any longer, get your tongue ready and let’s do it.

‘TH [unvoiced], F, S’. ‘TH [voiced], V, Z’. ‘Six texts’. ‘vuh-vuh-vei’, ‘vuh-vuh-vei’. ‘voi, voi, voi’. ‘Should we go?’ ‘Eddie edited it’.

Hey, it’s Hadar, and welcome to my sprint. A sprint is a 10-minute exercise that I’ve developed, aimed at helping you boost your pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary through consistent repetition. And it is based on my Pronunciation Confidence Method. Let’s get started.

‘th – f – s’. Stick the tongue out – th; bring the bottom lip up – f; s – bring the tongue up inside your mouth. ‘th – f – s’.

Now let’s move on to ‘th – v – z’. Same positions: tongue out – th; lip up – v; z – tongue up inside the mouth, but this time it’s voiced. So again – ‘th – v – z’.

Now we’re going to move on to practicing diphthongs. Diphthongs are changing vowels. Let’s begin with /ai/, and we’ll use it with the ‘v’ sound. ‘vuh, vuh, vai’, ‘vuh, vuh, vai’, ‘vuh, vuh, vai’.

/ei/ –  ‘vuh, vuh, vei’, ‘vuh, vuh, vei’, ‘vuh, vuh, vei’.

/oʊ/ – ‘vuh, vuh, vow’, ‘vuh, vuh, vow’, ‘vuh, vuh, vow’. ‘vow, vow, vow, vow, vow, vow’. Very good.

/ɔɪ/ – ‘voi, voi, voi, voi, voy, voi’.

/æʊ/ – as  a “now”. ‘vaw, vaw, vaw, vaw, vaw, vaw’. Good.

Take a deep breath in, breathe out. Let’s move on.

Tongue twisters. “Eddie edited it”. “Eddie edited it”. ‘e-dee e-duh-duh dit’, ‘e-dee e-duh-duh dit’, ‘e-dee e-duh-duh dit’. Good.

Let’s move on to tricky transitions. ‘through and through’, ‘through and through’, ‘through and through’.

‘six texts’, ‘six texts’, ‘six texts’, ‘six texts’, ‘six texts’.

‘of the month’. ‘of the month’, ‘of the month’, ‘of the month’, ‘of the month’. ‘the sixth of the month, the sixth of the month, the sixth of the month, the sixth of the month’.

Let’s practice transitions where there is an R, a flap T and an R.

‘order, order, order, order, order’. ‘border, border, border, border, border’. ‘charter, charter, charter, charter, charter’.  ‘quarter, quarter, quarter’. ‘porter, porter, porter, porter, porter, porter’. You can do it.

‘smarter, smarter, smarter, smarter, smarter, smarter’.

Good. Let’s move on to drilling and practicing the -ED suffix. The -ED suffix can sound like a /t/ sound when it’s after a voiceless consonant; like a /d/ sound when it’s after a voiced consonant; or like an /əd/ when it’s after a T or a D. Let’s practice it.

‘worked, worked, worked, worked, worked, worked’. ‘focused, focused, focused, focused, focused, focused’. ‘locked, locked, locked, locked, locked, locked’.

Now a /d/ sound: ‘hugged, hugged, hugged, hugged, hugged’. ‘robbed, robbed, robbed, robbed, robbed’. ‘begged, begged, begged, begged, begged’.

Now /əd/: ‘waited, waited, waited, waited, waited, waited’. ‘needed, needed, needed, needed, needed, needed’. ‘granted, granted, granted, granted, granted, granted’.

Intonation. Yes/no questions. Rising-rising intonation: “Did you see that? Did you see that? Did you see that?”

“Would you like a cup of coffee? Would you like a cup of coffee? Would you like a cup of coffee?”

“Should we go? Should we go? Should we go? Should we go? Should we go?”

Now WH questions. Listen to the intonation. “Where’s your house? Where’s your house? Where’s your house? Where’s your house? Where is your house?”

“What are you doing? What are you doing? What are you doing? What are you doing?”

“How do you know that? How do you know that? How do you know that? How do you know that?”

Vocabulary. “go over”, /ɡoʊ ˈoʊvər/. ‘go over, go over’. To go over something is to look at something really carefully and deeply. ‘go over, go over, go over, go over, go over, go over’.

“We need to go over the proposal tomorrow. We need to go over the proposal tomorrow. We need to go over the proposal tomorrow. We need to go over the proposal tomorrow”.

“I need to go over my lines for the play. I need to go over my lines for the play, so I don’t forget. I need to go over my lines for the play. I need to go over my lines for the play”.

“Let’s go over the rules once again. Let’s go over the rules once again. Let’s go over the rules once again. Let’s go over the rules once again”.

Grammar. Let’s practice Present Perfect sentences – something that happened in the past, but we don’t know exactly when, and maybe it doesn’t even matter.

“I’ve never been there. I have never, I’ve never, I’ve never, I’ve never been. I’ve never been. I’ve never been. I’ve never been.” “I’ve never been there. I’ve never been there. I’ve never been there. I’ve never been there.”

“She’s lived here all her life. She’s lived. She’s lived, she’s lived, she’s lived, she’s lived.” “She’s lived here all her life. She’s lived here all her life. She’s lived here all their life. She’s lived here all her life.”

“What have you done? What have you done? What have you done?” “have you done, have you done, have you done.” “What have you done? What have you done? What have you done? What have you done?”

“I’ve seen that movie. I’ve seen, have seen, have seen, I’ve seen, I’ve seen, I’ve seen, I’ve seen.” “I’ve seen that movie. I’ve seen that movie. I’ve seen that movie.”

“She’s seen, she’s seen, she’s seen, she’s seen, she has seen, she’s seen that movie. She’s seen that movie. She’s seen that movie. She’s also seen that movie. She’s seen that movie. She’s seen that movie. She’s seen that movie. She’s seen that movie.”

That’s it. Let’s do a lip trill together. Massage your jaw a little bit, and hum.

Put your hand on your belly. Take a deep breath in, breathe out, take a deep breath in, breathe out. Say something kind to yourself about your English. Take a deep breath in, breathe out.

Well done, my friend, well done. Do you feel like you have worked out a little bit? Good. Now, if you want to find out how you can grab 30 different sprints for daily practice, and also to truly learn how to internalize new concepts, words, and sounds in English into your day-to-day speech, I recommend that you check out the Sprint Master.

The Sprint Master is a mini program that we created with 30 different sprints, and a bonus sprint that will teach you all about conditionals. Not really teach you, but get you to use conditionals effortlessly. So, check it out: it’s easy to access, you can get it on an app, you can track your progress, and it is super, super effective. So, click the link in the description to check it out. And in the meantime, thank you so much for working out with me today. And have a beautiful, beautiful day. I’ll catch you next time.

The InFluency Podcast
The InFluency Podcast
82. 10-min Powerful Pronunciation Practice | HADAR'S SPRINT
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