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How To Learn New Vocabulary | Build Pronunciation Confidence

Tired of learning ABOUT improving your vocabulary instead of actually IMPROVING IT?!

In this episode, I share with you an in-depth vocabulary exercise that will help you build pronunciation confidence and use new words frequently and confidently.

I based these drills on the understanding that there are many words you know but never use, for several reasons:

  • You’re not confident PRONOUNCING them.
  • They’re not accessible (you forget to use them)
  • You don’t feel confident using them correctly in a sentence
  • I developed a 5-step system to overcome these challenges and enhance your vocabulary.

People who have tried it told me that for the first time they felt that they were growing their vocabulary!

In this episode, we’ll use this technique with the following words: inevitable, accurate, obvious, redundant, valuable. Afterward, you’ll see how much easier it is for you to use them in a sentence.

Click here to download my vocabulary planner so you can use this technique to learn and use ANY word in English. 

TRANSCRIPT

Are you tired of knowing all these words in English, but only using a fraction of them? Are you tired of not being able to remember the word or how to say it when you actually need to use it? If that’s the case for you, then you, my friend, are in the right place. Because today I’m going to share with you the most effective technique to learning and integrating new words into your vocabulary.

And I’m going to do it right here with you. So this is going to be a real exercise. This is why I put my Guns’n’Roses T-shirt because I am going to do some heavy lifting today with you. I ain’t just going to be teaching you stuff, I’m going to be doing it with you right now. So, drink a glass of water, close the door, put your headset on, and let’s get started.

By the way, if you’re new to my channel, my name’s Hadar and I’m a non native speaker, just like yourself. And this is the place for you if you want to learn how to speak English with clarity, confidence, and pride. So make sure you hit that subscribe button.

Okay. Let’s get started with your vocabulary upgrade. This is a 5-step exercise. The first step is to collect words. The second step is to build pronunciation confidence. The third step is to use existing examples. The fourth step is to create your own examples. And the fifth step is to use these words intentionally in a conversation. So let’s do it together with the five words that I’m going to introduce to you today.

So step number one, I got you covered – I’ve already collected five words that I’m sure you’d want to use more spontaneously and freely when speaking. The first word is “redundant”. So, let’s say you don’t know what this word means. First thing you want to do is go to the dictionary and look it up. I recommend English-English dictionary. So if I go to the dictionary, I see that it says “Not or no longer needed or useful”. Great.

The next step I want to do is to develop pronunciation confidence, which means that I want to get my mouth used to saying this word confidently. For that, I need to break it down in my head. I need to know what I’m supposed to say in every single syllable. And if there is some sort of struggle, I need to understand it now and resolve it before trying to use it when speaking.

Because here’s the thing. Your brain is not going to retrieve that word when you are speaking freely if you are not confident about the pronunciation. Because the brain is really smart and your brain is not going to want to put you in an uncomfortable situation. So if you are uncertain of how to say the word, if it doesn’t roll off your mouth, then you will not be using this word. This is why this step of developing the pronunciation confidence is super important. Do not skip it. Trust me.

And I’ve had students going through this method and technique, and they tell me it has been the most effective technique that they’ve ever used, and they really grew their vocabulary used, their active vocabulary. So, don’t listen to me, take their word for it.

Now, “redundant”. Let’s break it down. We start with ‘ri’, ‘ri’. It’s an R sound and a relaxed ‘i’. I hope you’re doing it with me. I told you, close the door. ‘ri’. Then we have ‘duhn’, like “I’m done with you”. ‘duhn’, ‘duhn’. It’s a D sound, a cup, and an N. ‘duhn’. And then ‘d’nt’, ‘d’nt’ .In the middle we have a schwa sound, it’s a D and T – ‘d’nt’.

Yes, sometimes the T is barely pronounced, it could be a held T – ‘redundan’. But if this is too much right now – we are working on increasing your vocabulary – go ahead and release that T. Don’t focus on making it perfect because a lot of native speakers release that T anyway: redundant, redundant, redundant.

Now, the next step is to say it 30 times in a row.

Let’s do it together, and again, I told you – this is a hands-on practice video, so I’m going to be doing it with you right now. So, don’t just look at me. Do it with me. Okay?

Redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant.

10 more times. Redundant. Redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant, redundant. Three more, one, good! Okay. How do you say the word? Okay, good.

So, now you know how to say the word. You’ve developed the muscle memory. You’re pretty confident about how to say it. If you’re not confident yet, do it again and again and again until it’s really clear. Use the Google search or use Siri or use your notes app, and record it and see if it detects the word clearly. Redundant, redundant. Great.

Now that you know how to pronounce it, and even if you did know how to pronounce it before, still say it out loud 30 times. Again, it’s a word that you don’t use on a regular basis, and your mouth is just not confident using it. So you’re taking a shortcut by saying it many times. It’s like you’re tricking your brain to think that, “Yeah, I’ve been using it, you know, all day long”. So this is why it’s easier for me to retrieve it and to use it when needed.

Okay. Redundant. Now the next step is to use existing examples. So what we’re going to do now is we’re going to go to YouGlish, we’re going to open a tab and we’re going to write on YouGlish “redundant”. And then a bunch of videos are going to come up with the word “redundant”. And they’ll show you exactly that one sentence where the person uses the word “redundant”.

You can either do that or you can just google sentences with “redundant”. And then you’ll go to sentences.com, or there are many other websites that just collect different sentences from the online sphere, and show you how this word is used in a sentence.

So, at this stage, this is exercise number 3, at this stage you’re only reading out loud: out loud, don’t just copy-paste it, reading out loud sentences with the word “redundant”. So, I’ve collected a few examples for you. Let’s listen to the first one.

“So Simon’s right that it does seem to be a redundant phrase. Why do we need the adjective behavioral?”

Okay, good. One sentence, a little patronizing. “It does seem like a redundant phrase. Why do we need the adjective behavioral”, right? You can put it on a show, too. “It does seem like a redundant phrase. Why do we need the adjective behavioral?” So you want to say it three times out loud.

“It does seem like a redundant phrase. It does seem like a redundant phrase. It does seem like a redundant phrase. Why do we need the adjective behavioral?” So, it’s in front of you. You can listen to him and then repeat after it. Do not write it down, it’s really important that you only do it by heart.

Now, the reason why we’re repeating it in context is because your brain starts to understand the context of this word. This is why it’s really, really important to always put a new word into context. Don’t just say the word out loud, and that’s it, and expect yourself to use it. The brain doesn’t work that way. You have to use it in context, and hear it in context, and then intentionally use it in context.

Okay, so let’s do it one more time.

“So this redundant signal will be saying, “Again, again, again”. “So this redundant signal will be saying, “Again, again, again”. And again, have fun with it. “So this redundant signal will be saying, “Again, again, again”. “So this redundant signal will be saying, “Again, again, again”. Okay. So you should be saying each sentence three times.

And then you want to create your own sentence out loud, do not write it down. You got to challenge yourself here because that’s what ultimately you’ll need to do, right, to come up with it on the spot. So now that you’ve looked at three examples, you want to use the word “redundant” effortlessly. For example, “You’ve already said that, so it’s pretty redundant. You’ve already said that, so it’s pretty redundant”.

Now I want you to come up with a sentence and say it to yourself out loud, and right after put it in the comments. So, one sentence with the word “redundant”. I’m waiting. I know it’s challenging. Try it anyway. You can pause the video, think about it.

Because we’re practicing it now together, don’t say to yourself, “Okay, I’ll do it later”. Pause the video, come up with a sentence, one sentence, two sentences, three sentences, write them in the comments, and then continue the video.

The next step, which we can’t do right now, but you need to take a mental note and do it next time you have a conversation in English – I want you to take the word “redundant” and use it intentionally. That means that you’re going to have to manipulate the conversation in a way that allows you to use the word “redundant” in the conversation. Okay?

So you start speaking, keeping in mind the word redundant and saying to yourself, “What can I say that will make sense for me to use the word “redundant”? Redundant. Redundant.

Okay, next word. Let’s do this entire process with the word “inevitable”. By the way, I decided to choose only adjectives today because I feel that adjectives are things that we’re lacking. Because when it comes to nouns, it’s pretty straightforward cause you can’t change it with other things.

But when it comes to adjectives, I mean, you don’t have to use adjectives, but when you do, it makes your language richer, and you become more specific, which is something that non native speakers experienced. Like they’re not specific, they’re very general, they’re not particular. So, learning new adjectives can definitely help you with feeling more varied and expressive.

Inevitable. Inevitable. Okay. So first we want to define to ourselves, the word inevitable. It says “certain to happen, unavoidable”. Great. So now I have a fairly clear/vague idea of what this word is. Remember, to really get it in your system, in your body, you need to use it in context. This is why we are going to search for sentences with this word in a sec. But before that, let’s build up that pronunciation confidence.

Inevitable. Inevitable. Primary stress is on ‘ne’ ‘ne’, iNEvitable. Inevitable. We begin with an ‘i’ sound: ‘i-neh-vuh-‘, it’s a V sound and a schwa. ‘i-neh-vuh-duh, that’s a flap T, so it sounds like a D. ‘i-neh-vuh-duh-bol: it’s a B sound, a schwa, and a dark L. You create this tension in the back of your throat. You can even imagine as if there is an O sound between the B and the L. Inevitable. Inevitable, unavoidable. Inevitable.

Let’s say it 30 times in a row. Are you ready? Take a deep breath. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. That’s ten. You can go faster and slower as you wish. I’m here doing it with you. So keep going.

Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Good. 10 more times. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Inevitable. Very good. Now we want to hear it in context.

So let’s go to YouGlish. Not physically, just let’s, let’s just google YouGlish, okay. “The harmful effects of stress on your health are not inevitable”. “The harmful effects of stress on your health are not inevitable. The harmful effects of stress on your health are not inevitable. The harmful effects of stress on your health are not inevitable”. Play with it.

Another sentence, let’s listen. “The truth is, you will die. I’m going to die, it’s inevitable”. “I’m going to die, it’s inevitable. I’m going to die, it’s inevitable. I’m going to die, it’s inevitable”.

Okay, the next one, let’s listen. “Regardless of its inevitable negative outcome”. And let’s say it out loud three times: “Regardless of its inevitable negative outcome. Regardless of its inevitable negative outcome. Regardless of its inevitable negative outcome”.

And now, I want you to pause the video and think of three sentences where you can use the word “inevitable”. First, think it, then say it, and after that, write it in the comments. Okay, good. I hope you paused the video because otherwise, it’s going to be less effective.

And the whole purpose of this video is to get you to start using these words, and to see for yourself that it is effective if you do it step by step by step. Trust me on that one, and invest the time and energy into coming up with a few sentences with the word “inevitable”. And then, I want you to use the word “inevitable” intentionally in a sentence.

Next stop, the word “accurate”. Accurate. If I go to the dictionary and I look it up, I see “accurate” is “correct in all details, or exact”. Accurate. Sometimes you may have more than one definition, but the purpose is to get a vague idea as to what this word is, but then to see how it’s being used in context. Okay? That’s what really, really matters. It’s not about the definition, it’s not about the meaning of the word in your native language. It’s how this word is being used in English.

Now let’s build up that pronunciation confidence. Accurate. Accurate. Let’s break it down. ‘a’ as in “cat”, ‘a’ – that’s the primary stress. ‘a-kyuh’, ‘kyuh’, ‘kyuh’, it’s a K sound, a Y and a schwa. ‘a-kyuh-r’t’. Round your lips for the R, and then there is a schwa and a T. Whether you hold it or whether you release it, it doesn’t matter right now.

Accurate. Accurate. 30 times. Accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate. 10 more. Accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate. And then the word starts losing its meaning just by the fact that you’ve been saying it for so many times.

10 more. Accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate, accurate. Right? We’re good with the pronunciation, right? Good. There is no fear around saying this word anymore. Good.

Now, let’s look at a few examples. YouGlish… “They were fairly accurate, I think, on their price, but they really missed the number of rigs”. “They were fairly accurate, I think, on the price. There were fairly accurate, I think, on the price”. Now, sometimes it’s going to be a long sentence. Just take that one chunk where the word “accurate” is used. Okay. Again. “There were fairly accurate, I think, on the price. There were fairly accurate, I think, on the price”.

Next one. “And I think it’s much more accurate to say we are deeply overwhelmed”. “And I think it’s much more accurate to say we are deeply overwhelmed. And I think it’s much more accurate to say we are deeply overwhelmed. And I think it’s much more accurate to say we are deeply overwhelmed”.

Another one. “Get your experience more accurate information processing”. “Get to experience more accurate information processing. Get to experience more accurate information processing. Get to experience more accurate information processing”. Okay? So we said each sentence three times.

Now pause the video and come up with at least two sentences with the word “accurate”. First of all, think about it, say it out loud, and only then write it in the comments. Accurate.

I’m waiting. Pause the video. Let’s move on to the word “valuable”. Valuable. Valuable is a thing of great worth. Let’s talk about the pronunciation. ‘val’ ‘val’, and then we have ‘lyuh’, ‘lyuh’: it’s an L sound, a ‘yuh’ and a schwa. ‘val-yuh’, ‘val-yuh-b’l’, ‘b’l’.  ‘val-yuh-b’l’. Just like with “inevitable”, we have the B sound, schwa and dark L: valuable, valuable.

Let’s say it 30 times in a row. Take a deep breath, into your belly. Valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable. Valuable. Valuable, valuable, valuable. Valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable, valuable. Good! Check, on pronunciation.

Now, let’s hear it in context. “I think these lessons are very valuable in other areas”. “I think these lessons are very valuable in other areas. I think these lessons are very valuable in other areas. I think these lessons are very valuable in other areas”. And yes, adding hand gestures can really help you remember the meaning of the word. I mean, this means, valuable, valuable.

Another example. “And your time is really valuable in Europe. A lot of people underestimate how important their time is”. “Your time is really valuable in Europe. Your time is really valuable in Europe. Your time is really valuable in Europe”.

Next example. “They become diamonds – one of the most valuable thing that exists”. “They become diamonds – one of the most valuable thing that exists. They become diamonds – one of the most valuable thing that exists. They become diamonds – one of the most valuable thing that exists”.

Now, turn off the video and use the word “valuable” in a sentence, in three sentences. Valuable. “Valuable” is a valuable word. So I really want you to get off this video knowing how to use “valuable”, and using it confidently. After all, you’ve said it 30 times already today. Valuable. Sentences. I’m waiting.

The next word is “obvious”. Even if this word is obvious to you, look it up the dictionary anyway, both for the definition and the pronunciation. “Easily perceived or understood, clear, self-evident, or apparent”. Obvious. So, to pronounce this word, we start with ‘aa’ as in father, and then it’s a B sound, very small one, ‘aab’. Then you move to the V immediately: ‘aab-vee-y’s’. ‘vee’ – high ‘ee’, a ‘y’ sound, schwa, and S.

Listen: y’s, y’s, y’s. The ‘y’ is an intrusive vowel that appears between two vowels when you connect them together. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Now, if this transition, the B-V transition is challenging for you – Hi, Spanish speakers – then listen to me, drop the B. It’s not accurate, but clarity is more important than accuracy.

So if you get to say it without the B, and you use it freely and confidently, then you better say it that way. Then with a B, but then you’d get stuck and you won’t use that word. That doesn’t serve us as well. Right? It’s less valuable for us.

So. Obvious, obvious, obvious, obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obviously.

10 more. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. Obvious. That’s my move for obvious. Obvious. Right? It’s obvious. Or ‘ovious’. Obvious.

Let’s look at a few examples. “What about fear when there is no clear and obvious danger?” “What about fear when there’s no clear and obvious danger? What about fear when there’s no clear and obvious danger? What about fear when there is no clear and obvious danger?” See how I did that? Obvious danger.

Another example. “Now go down to the mouth of the Missouri near St. Louis, and it’s pretty obvious that that river is a big deal”. “And it’s pretty obvious that that river is a big deal”. By the way, he did not pronounce the B here. “And it’s really obvious that that river is a big deal. And it’s pretty obvious that that river is a big deal. And it’s pretty obvious that that river is a big deal”.

Let’s do another one. “I think people simplify that, “Oh, he doesn’t like sequels”. It’s obvious that I like sequels, I just did one. I’m about to do another one”.

“It’s obvious that I like sequels. It’s obvious that I like sequels”. See, he’s doing the same thing as I do. He learned from me. It’s okay, it’s okay. “It’s obvious that I like sequels. It’s obvious that I like sequels. It’s obvious that I like sequels”. Dropped the B, sounded the same, still.” It’s obvious that I like sequels”.

Good. Pause the video, come up with three sentences with the word “obvious”, but don’t make them so obvious, okay? Just slightly obvious. Obviously. Obvious. Go ahead.

And remember that once you say the new sentences out loud and write them in the comments, by the way, then I want you to intentionally use this word in a conversation next time you have a conversation. If you don’t have anyone to talk to, then just turn on your phone recorder and just speak to yourself freely, and answer a question or introduce yourself, or do something that creates this excitement around speaking. And intentionally use one of the words that we discussed today.

Let’s have a little recap here. We talked about the word “redundant”. We talked about the word “inevitable”; about the word “accurate”. We talked about the word “valuable”. We talked about the word “obvious”. Good.

And now I want you to take that system. By the way, I created a Vocabulary Planner for you that summarizes this system and allows you to create your own list of vocabulary with the five steps that we discussed here today, so click the link below to download it.

Also, on my website there is a list of more sentences with all of these five words, if you need more examples, and if you want to practice it out loud. So come on over to my website and just practice with a sentence that I’ve created for you. And don’t forget to download the Vocabulary Planner.

Okay, that’s it. If you liked this video, make sure to like it and to share it with your, colleagues, and friends, and students, and your mama that really needs to work on her vocabulary. And once you’re done, if you want to share your thoughts with me, either write it in the comments or coming over to Instagram, @hadar.accentsway. Where I connect and communicate with my students and followers over on my DMS or in the posts. So, come on over, I would love to hear from you. You can find me at @hadar.accentsway.

In the meantime, have a beautiful week. Stay healthy, stay safe, and speak up because mistakes is the only way to learn.

The InFluency Podcast
The InFluency Podcast
42. How To Learn New Vocabulary? Build Pronunciation Confidence 🔥
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Want to practice some more?

Say these sentences our loud, and then come up with your OWN sentence for each word. You can share it in the comments below.

redundant

● You already mentioned that before so it’s redundant here.
● My boss thinks my position is redundant so he’s going to fire me.
● Two engines may seem redundant but if one of them stops working, you want to have the other one just in case.

inevitable

● They hated each other so much that their fight was inevitable.
● If you boil water, it’s inevitable that it’ll evaporate.
● Nothing is inevitable, everything can be changed or stopped.

accurate

● His story is 100% accurate. I checked it several times.
● The numbers in the report are accurate.
● You have to make sure your analysis is accurate.

valuable

● This ring is very valuable and dear to my heart.
● Some of her tips were very valuable and helped me a lot.
● We managed to gather some valuable info for our operation.

obvious

● It’s obvious that he likes you. He can’t take his eyes off of you.
● Nothing is obvious about him. Everything he does surprises me.
● There are some obvious things you can see right from the start.

Want more helpful vocabulary episodes?

Want more words? Check out the episode about vocabulary upgrade and about my 5-step system of learning new words.

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19 Responses

  1. His apperance was inevitable.
    Because of bad weather condition the accident was inevitable.
    Bugs in the software codes are inevitable.

  2. Redundant:
    This morning I was in a meeting, and the host was pretty redundant with the information on the slide show.

    My husband has been talking about the same matter the whole day, which is redundant and desperate.

    I think we are doing the same leisure activity every weekend, which is redundant, doesn’t it?

    Inevitable:

    Our success will be inevitable if we remain focused on the goal.

    If you continue your life in that way, get sick will be inevitable.

    I worked as hard as I could, but the company bankruptcy was inevitable.

    Accurate:
    Amelia wanted to get that job, but she needed to be more accurate in her mathematics calculations.

    You need to be accurate with the sizes to make the dress. Otherwise, it will be loose enough.

    Will it be accurate to get holidays between this awful pandemic situation?

    Valuable:

    My family is the most valuable treasure in my whole life.

    Daniel has valuable skills to get the job position in that recognized and will know company.

    Despite all the effort, the company manager was not able to notice her valuable attempt in this project.

    Obvious:

    Sometimes, things are obvious enough to need an explanation.

    You don’t want to go with us to the party, it is obvious, I can see it on your face and attitude.

    It seems pretty obvious, but no one could imagine that he was cheating her wife.

  3. It’s so obvious that the consequences of the wastage of our valuable time are inevitable.
    As the days pass CDs and DVDs are becoming redundant due to the drastic attraction towards the internet.
    His project was selected for the accurate representation of the entire concept of his idea.

  4. I think this kind of explanation is too redundant.

    This quarantine was inevitable for all of us.

    Remember to check if that data are accurate.

    The time you spend with your family is a valuable time

    Sometime you should give more examples, not everything is obvious

  5. Here there are the sentences using the words redundant, inevitable, accurate, valuable and obvious.
    1 Your poem is nice but if you repeat the word “destiny” for a third time it will become redundant.
    2 It will seem redundant if you put more red roses in the bouquet.
    3 I don’t want to sound redundant but did I ask you to take care every time you go out?

    Inevitable
    1 It’s inevitable to get sick, that is why the importance of eating only healthy food.
    2 It’s inevitable to feel sorry every time you see the suffering of other people.
    3 Rising prices of goods is an inevitable outcome that reflects the economic world situation.
    Accurate
    1 I’ll try to be as accurate as possible in my written report.
    2 Accurate statistics on the pandemic is simply scaring.
    3 Maths are accurate.

    Valuable
    1 English communication skills are so valuable as to let you achieve any of your most important goals.
    2 A good knowlage on human relations is a valuable quality for success.
    3 Today good health is more valuable than gold.

    Obvious

    1 It’s obvious our responsability of the damage on the environment.
    2 The true color of the sea appears to be obvious. It’s blue.
    3 A man’s thoughts are never obvious. You need to make the correct questions to get to know a little bit of them.

  6. It is an inevitable circle of nutrition: either you eat food, either you are the food.

  7. I’ve been using this technique for years that I need to alternate with something else. I’m tedious about this. It’s already redundant for my studies. Does redundant synonym obsolete by the way?

  8. I’ve been using this technique for years. I’m tedious about this. It’s already redundant for me.

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